You Are Not Alone

Updated: Feb 18, 2019


Students here at Salisbury University get reminded every time they use a school bathroom about the unfortunate role sexual assault continues to play not only in today’s society, but on a college campus.


The maroon and gold flyer hangs along the rigid stall door consisting of multiple phone numbers of people who are available to help sexual assault victims.



To some, it may be seen as a simple flyer that goes unnoticed. However, that does not take away the purpose of acting as a reminder that you are not alone. SU shows how committed it is to supporting sexual assault victims by providing students with the resources they need.


SU has had 14 reported cases of sexual assault in the past three years, all of which occurred on campus. These statistics show that as students move off campus, they are less likely to report an incident of sexual assault. These posters in the bathrooms allow women to get the information they need, whether assault happens on campus or off.


Years 2015, 2016 and 2017 (from left to right)

Hadley Miller, freshman at SU, thinks the posters are an important resource for women on campus and show the university's dedication to fostering a safe and healthy campus.


“I think it’s great that Salisbury shows their support towards victims of sexual assault by having those flyers put up in the bathrooms,” Miller said. “I can see why the flyers may go unnoticed or overlooked by some individuals, but for the ones who are looking for a sign to reach out for help, I think it speaks to them. Not only does it represent the support our school shows, but also, the resources they have allocated and are willing to provide to do whatever they can to help students.”


The resources provided by college campuses today remind students that they are encouraged to reach out for help, no matter the issue, because at the end of the day, all they want is what is best for the students. Recently, one can observe an increase in discussion around sexual assault due to public influencers opening up through social media to share their stories.


One minute you are aimlessly scrolling through Twitter on your phone laughing at memes until reality hits you; the “News for you” notification pops up, and instantly your eyes are drawn into it.


Your trembling thumb clicks the notification out of curiosity, and the title reads, “R. Kelly’s accusers speak out in six-part docu-series.” Just like that, your ordinary day takes a dark turn in means of paying attention to the unfortunate realities occurring in today’s society.


On Jan. 4, a three-night documentary series called “Surviving R. Kelly” aired on Lifetime, providing an outlook for the voices of women who survived the horrible behavior of R. Kelly. Kelly is known as a famous R&B artist who rose to fame during the 2000s by creating a career for himself based on the sexual messages conveyed through his music.


The creation of this raw and honest documentary has brought more public awareness to the subject of sexual assault in means of trying to destroy the stigma that continues to surround it.


As a society, we have progressed toward burying the stigma associated with reaching out for help concerning sexual assault. The increase in social media use has positively affected this prominent societal issue.


From creating the #MeToo Movement to having television stations like Lifetime, one can see how the increase in awareness regarding the subject has encouraged victims of sexual assault to come forward and share their stories.


You have a voice. You deserve to be heard. You are not alone.


For more information on SU's sexual misconduct policy, click here.


If you or someone you know has been a victim of sexual assault, please contact any one of these resources or talk to a trusted adult.


Office of Institutional Equity: 410-543-6426

University Police Department: 410-543-6222

SU Counseling Center: 410-543-6070

Life Crisis Center: 410-749-4357 or 2-1-1

National Sexual Assault Hotline: 800-656-4673

By ALEXI TERRIS

Staff writer

Featured photo: Alexi Terris image.

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© 2019 The Flyer

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