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"Wellness to go" expands healthcare access on campus

Updated: Mar 11


SU's new wellness-to-go vending machine at its location in th GSU


A new opportunity for healthcare access has made it's way to campus courtesy of Student Health Services. Located in the Guerrieri Student Union in front of the Office of Diversity Equity and Inclusion is a new Wellness to go vending machine with various over the counter and reproductive health medications and resources.


The machine holds ibuprofen, eye drops, antibiotic ointment and many more products. A comprehensive list with proper uses and prices can be found on the student health services website under the vending machine tab.(https://www.salisbury.edu/administration/student-affairs/student-health-services/vending-machine.aspx)

 

Aside from the over the counter cold and allergy medications, ChapSticks and nose sprays, there are pregnancy tests, condoms and emergency contraception which also includes a coupon for a free appointment at Student Health Services.

 

This machine brings Salisbury University into compliance with a new requirement from the Maryland higher education commission. This piece of legislation requires institutions to develop and implement a plan for providing or referring students to a range of resources and education regarding reproductive health services. One specification made was the need for access to over the counter resources on campus.

 

“It's definitely more accessible than somewhere like CVS, also it's somewhere that people walk by, so they may need something and not even realize it.” Said Freshman Carter Phillips.

 

It also required collaboration with students to develop the plan, in the case of SU it was fulfilled through the work of the Student Government Association who also attended the ribbon cutting ceremony on February 19.

 

This new option gives access to the products inside 24 hours a day and at a discount. This is to try to accommodate students at anytime in the day or night and help offset the rising cost of some of these products on the shelves at local pharmacies and overall make health services more accessible to students.

 

“I'd personally be more comfortable with the vending machine,” Phillips said. “Not having to have that confrontation of having to request certain things it might be easier to just go to the vending machine.”

 

Regardless of the new level of accessibility it is important to make appointments with student health services or your physician for persistent and severe illness. It is meant to aid in health care access not replace traditional medical care.

 

The machine accepts gull card and credit/debit card payments and the university specifies that all purchases are confidential.

 

By MEGHAN BEAN

News Editor

Featured image courtesy of Meghan Bean

 

 

 

 

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